After being told you need surgery and having to go under the knife, you may be feeling a little nervous. The good news is that most surgical procedures are usually quick, safe, and effective in fixing the problem. However, before your scheduled surgery date arrives, there are some precautions to take beforehand. It’s normal to feel anxious about an upcoming surgery, but take comfort in knowing that it’s not as scary as it seems. With any type of surgery comes the risk of pain post-procedure. As such, many patients ask what pain reliever they can take before going into surgery so that they have an easier time recovering from the operation. While there aren’t many risks to taking a certain pain reliever before going into surgery, there are certain things you should keep in mind before doing so. Check out this article for more information on which pain reliever you can take before going into surgery and why it’s advised against taking others beforehand.

What Pain Reliever Can I Take Before Surgery?

Many medications are available to help control pain before and after surgery. The pain reliever that is best for you will depend on your medical history and the type of surgery you are having. It is best to talk to your health care provider about the best pain reliever for you. Some common pain relievers include acetaminophen, ibuprofen, and tramadol. These medications can be taken alone or combined with other medications or anesthesia during and after surgery.

What Type Of Pain Reliever Can You Take Before Surgery?

1. Acetaminophen

Acetaminophen is a common pain reliever that can be taken before, during, or after surgery. It is available in many different forms, such as tablets, capsules, and liquid. It can also be obtained without a prescription by purchasing over-the-counter medication from a chemist or pharmacy. Acetaminophen is an effective pain reliever that often works well for mild to moderate pain. However, it may not be the best option for people who have a history of liver problems or kidney problems. This is because acetaminophen can cause damage to the liver and kidneys when used in excess amounts. If you have any of these conditions, you should avoid taking acetaminophen before surgery.

2. Ibuprofen

Ibuprofen is another common pain reliever that can be taken before, during, or after surgery. It is available in many different forms such as tablets, capsules, and liquid. It can also be obtained without a prescription by purchasing over-the-counter medication from a chemist or pharmacy. Like acetaminophen, it is an effective pain reliever that often works well for mild to moderate pain. However, it may not be the best option for people who have a history of liver problems or kidney problems. This is because ibuprofen can cause damage to the liver and kidneys when used in excess amounts. If you have any of these conditions, you should avoid taking ibuprofen before surgery.

3. Tramadol

Tramadol is an opioid analgesic that can be taken before surgery to control moderate to severe pain after surgery has been performed (1). It works by acting on certain receptors on nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord (2). Tramadol is available in pill form and as a liquid injection that can be given intravenously (1). The common side effects of tramadol include nausea, dizziness, constipation, and drowsiness/dizziness when rising from bed/sitting up too quickly (1). These side effects usually disappear after about 24 hours of use (3). Other possible side effects include skin rash; itching; hives; swelling of the face, lips, tongue, or throat; fast or irregular heartbeat; problems with breathing; trouble swallowing or speaking; and changes in mood or behavior (1).

4. Morphine

Morphine is an opioid pain medication that acts by binding with opioid receptors in the brain and spinal cord to reduce pain (1). It can be given intravenously (IV) or by injection into a muscle. The common side effects of morphine include nausea, vomiting, dizziness, constipation, and drowsiness/dizziness when rising from bed/sitting up too quickly (1). These side effects usually disappear after about 24 hours of use (3). Other possible side effects include a skin rash; itching; hives; swelling of the face, lips, tongue, or throat; fast or irregular heartbeat; problems with breathing; trouble swallowing or speaking; and changes in mood or behavior (1).

5. Oxycodone

Oxycodone is another opioid pain medication that acts by binding with opioid receptors in the brain and spinal cord to reduce pain (1). It can be given intravenously (IV) or by injection into a muscle. The common side effects of oxycodone include nausea, vomiting, dizziness, constipation, and drowsiness/dizziness when rising from bed/sitting up too quickly (1). These side effects usually disappear after about 24 hours of use (3). Other possible side effects include a skin rash; itching; hives; swelling of the face, lips, tongue, or throat; fast or irregular heartbeat; problems with breathing; trouble swallowing or speaking; and changes in mood or behavior (1).

6. Naloxone

Naloxone is an opioid antagonist that binds with opioid receptors in the brain and spinal cord to reduce pain (1). It can be given intravenously (IV) or by injection into a muscle. The common side effects of naloxone include nausea, vomiting, dizziness, constipation, and drowsiness/dizziness when rising from bed/sitting up too quickly (1). These side effects usually disappear after about 24 hours of use (3). Other possible side effects include a skin rash; itching; hives; swelling of the face, lips, tongue, or throat; fast or irregular heartbeat; problems with breathing; trouble swallowing or speaking; and changes in mood or behavior (1).

7. Morphine sulfate

Morphine sulfate is a synthetic opioid pain medication that acts by binding with opioid receptors in the brain and spinal cord to reduce pain (1). It can be given intravenously (IV) or by injection into a muscle. The common side effects of morphine sulfate include nausea, vomiting, dizziness, constipation, and drowsiness/dizziness when rising from bed/sitting up too quickly (1). These side effects usually disappear after about 24 hours of use (3). Other possible side effects include a skin rash; itching; hives; swelling of the face, lips, tongue, or throat; fast or irregular heartbeat; problems with breathing; trouble swallowing or speaking; and changes in mood or behavior (1).

8. Buprenorphine

Buprenorphine is an opioid agonist-antagonist pain medication that acts by binding with opioid receptors in the brain and spinal cord to reduce pain (1). It can be given intravenously (IV) or by injection into a muscle. The common side effects of buprenorphine include nausea, vomiting, dizziness, constipation, and drowsiness/dizziness when rising from bed/sitting up too quickly (1). These side effects usually disappear after about 24 hours of use (3). Other possible side effects include a skin rash; itching; hives; swelling of the face, lips, tongue, or throat; fast or irregular heartbeat; problems with breathing; trouble swallowing or speaking; and changes in mood or behavior (1).

What Can You Take Before Surgery?

  1. Analgesic

A painkiller that will help relieve pain.

  1. Local Anaesthetic

An anesthetic that contains a numbing agent which will numb the area where the surgery will take place.

  1. Anti-emetic

A drug to prevent motion sickness or vomiting before having surgery.

  1. Anti-nausea drug

A drug to prevent nausea or vomiting before having surgery.

  1. Anti-diarrhoea drug

A drug that prevents diarrhea or vomiting before having surgery.

  1. Anti-spasmodic drug

A drug to prevent muscle spasms before having surgery.

  1. Anti-hyperglycemic drug

A drug to control blood sugar levels before having surgery.

  1. Anti-rheumatic drug

A drug to reduce pain, swelling, and inflammation before having surgery.

  1. Antihistamine

A drug that reduces the allergic reaction of the body before having surgery.

Bottom Line

Surgery is usually a safe and effective way to treat many different types of health problems. However, it can be scary for both the patient and their loved ones. With any surgery, you’ll likely experience some form of pain afterward. While it’s important to address the pain you’re in, it’s also important to avoid taking certain types of pain relievers before surgery. It’s important to know what pain relievers you can take before surgery and which ones you can’t. Most types of pain relievers can be taken before surgery, but there are certain situations when you shouldn’t take a certain type of pain reliever before going under the knife. For more information on which pain reliever you can take before surgery, keep reading.